Don’t Let Stink Bugs Ruin the Party!

Don’t Let Stink Bugs Ruin the Party!

Ron Brand started noticing an increase in stink bug calls about seven years ago. “People don’t call us when they have three or four stink bugs – they call us when they have hundreds of them,” says the owner of Ron’s Termite & Pest Control in Burlington, N.J. The worst case he handled was a house where the owner was getting ready for a party. “She had a big square porch with mosquito netting in each corner,” Brand continues. “We didn’t see that many stink bugs on the floor and furniture, but when we pulled back the netting, we saw hundreds and hundreds of them – maybe a thousand.” Though it’s primarily a nuisance pest, the brown marmorated stink bug infests houses and buildings at the onset of cooler temperatures. Populations have exploded in eastern states in recent years and have begun to migrate to other states throughout the Midwest and South. “My customers don’t care for them at all,” adds Brand, who has been in business since 1986, covering southern New Jersey, Philadelphia and lower Bucks County, PA. Brand swears by Talstar® Professional insecticide for stink bug control. A water-based product, Talstar Professional has a broad label and is approved for multiple use-sites, so you can use it almost anywhere: indoors and out, in industrial, commercial and food-handling areas. He used Talstar for his customer with stink bugs on her porch – and her party went off without a hitch. “We’ve used Talstar Professional for about 10 years – it’s my go-to product!” Brand notes. “We use it as a power spray twice a year for our regular...

Stink bugs: an increasingly foul presence.

The brown marmorated stink bug was first discovered in the United States in 1998. Today, they have been observed in over 35 states from coast to coast. The stink bug originated from Asia (specifically China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan), where it was regarded as a significant agricultural pest. It is feared that the stink bug will cause serious losses for fruit and vegetable farmers in America like it has across the globe. When autumn nights grow cooler, stink bugs become a nuisance for homeowners, entering structures under siding, into soffits, under roof shingles and through cracks around window and door frames to escape colder temperatures. Once indoors, stink bugs will go into a state of hibernation (diapause) where they wait for winter to pass. However, often the warmth inside the house causes them to become active, and they will fly clumsily around light fixtures. These pests earned their name thanks to their unique defense mechanism: scent glands that emit a pungent odor through holes in their abdomen. The smell has been compared to a very strong aroma of cilantro. While intended to help them repel predators like birds and lizards, stink bugs will release the scent if handled, injured or merely threatened by humans. Stink bugs have a body with a recognizable, shield-like shape. The brown marmorated stink bug is various shades of brown, with markings in a range of colors, from off-white to copper to blue. A good way to identify this particular species is by its alternating light bands on the antennae and dark bands on along the edge of the abdomen. To prevent these foul-smelling invaders...