I’m thankful for the pest control industry this Thanksgiving.

I’m thankful for the pest control industry this Thanksgiving.

It’s that time of year. We all start foraging our attics for last year’s winter clothes in the hopes that we can get all the buttons to button and the zippers to zip. We look at the calendar and realize that yes, it is already November, and those resolutions we made eleven months ago, if not completed, will be tabled for another eight weeks or so. We start to look forward to some of the most joyous times of year and hopefully, we take the opportunity to be thankful. Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday ever, ever, ever. The main events include football, parades and at least one huge meal without the fuss and muss of gift exchanges. Yes, I love Thanksgiving, and one of the main reasons I love it so much, is that, in general, I am a pretty thankful person. This season, I want you to know that I am thankful for pest control. Yep, you read that correctly. I am extremely thankful for the pest control industry and furthermore, I think that you should be too. Never mind the fact that this industry has enabled me to feed my family and pay my bills for the past ten years. I’d like to take a snapshot look at the pest control industry and show you why we all should be thankful for pest control. Here are a few facts on the pest control industry according to the National Pest Management Association and the United States Department of Labor Bureau Labor Statistics: Pest control helps us live longer. Innovations in pest management parallel an increase in life expectancy....
Installation and placement guidelines for the Verifi™ bed bug detector.

Installation and placement guidelines for the Verifi™ bed bug detector.

As an FMC Market Specialist, I’ve had the opportunity to spend a lot of time out in the field with our customers who have added the Verifi™ bed bug detector to their portfolio. It’s been very exciting to see what this detector is really capable of in a variety of different bed bug situations and locations. I recently visited a pest professional who wasn’t getting the kind of results he was hoping for, and it turned out to be due to improper placement of the detectors. For this reason, I wanted to share some guidelines for how to properly install the Verifi bed bug detector that should help professionals get the absolute best results possible. Interview your customers. Find out where they spend their time and where they suspect the bed bugs may be. Using that information, focus the installation of the detectors in these areas where bed bugs are mostly likely to harborage. Make sure the placement location is clean. The wall, headboard or other piece of furniture may look clean, but dust and other debris can limit the adhesion of the detector to a surface. Wipe the area off with a damp cloth and allow it to dry in order to help ensure proper adhesion so that Verifi can remain in place for extended periods of time. Use the proper amount of detectors. The Verifi™ bed bug detector can influence bed bugs from 4 to 5 feet away in every direction. Detectors should be placed in areas conducive to bed bug aggregation or introduction. Every room will present a different scenario, but for best results, FMC recommends...

How to eliminate possible exposure to mosquitoes during West Nile virus (WNV) season.

West Nile virus season kicked off to an ealry start this year, which lead to the largest outbreak in nearly 10 years. Most West Nile virus (WNV) exposures in the United States occur from July through October, with a peak during the first two weeks of August. Texas has reported 1,355 cases of West Nile illnesses, including 52 deaths as of September 28, making this the largest outbreak of West Nile virus in Texas since 2003. The virus has been appearing in many parts of the country, but almost half of the cases are in Texas and the numbers are rising. Where has West Nile virus been and where is it going? West Nile virus is commonly found in Africa, Eastern Europe, West Asia, and the Middle East. It was first detected in the United States in 1999, during which time there was an outbreak in New York. By mid-June of 2002, it had traveled westward to Texas. Since then, it has been reported in mosquitoes, birds (such as blue jays and crows), horses, and humans. There has also been a continued westward movement of the virus. What are the symptoms of West Nile virus? Most people infected with WNV feel no symptoms. A minority develop meningitis or encephalitis, which can be fatal. Symptoms include fever, weakness, headache, and altered mental status. Skin rash, conjunctivitis, abdominal pain, cough, dyspnea, and diarrhea may also be present. Mosquitoes are no longer just a seasonal outdoor nuisance. They’re a public health threat. Below are some guidelines every pest management professional should be aware of to help reduce the risks of contracting West...