Suburban Exterminating Makes the Pest Industry Fun for Kids

Suburban Exterminating Makes the Pest Industry Fun for Kids

Does a tarantula sting? What does a roach eat? These are only a few of the pest industry-related questions that the children in Suburban Exterminating’s summer library events ask. Looking to get more involved in the community, Suburban Exterminating found a way for their entomologists to give back: educating children on animals, insects and the pest industry. “Suburban Exterminating was looking to become more involved with the community,” Bill Somerville, entomologist and General Manager at Suburban Exterminating, said. “We decided to start a children’s library program since many Long Island libraries double as community centers.” Entering its fourth year, the library events aim to share the pest industry professionals’ love of insects while entertaining and educating the children. At each session, the children have the opportunity to get up close and personal with the insects, hamster and other animals that Suburban Exterminating brings along. Lynn Frank, entomologist and Technical Director, said, “The children learn about animal and insect characteristics. We talk about their basic survival skills and how they adapt.”Many children come to the program with knowledge about the pest industry. Jacob, age 10 from Southampton, told us that a carpenter ant’s scientific name was Camponotus pennsylvanicus. Arielle, age 9 from Huntington, knew that a hamster was nocturnal. Though the purpose of the shows is educational, they’re enjoyable for both the child and the pest industry professionals. “We seem to have as much fun as the children do,” Somerville said. Currently booking shows for 2014, Suburban Exterminating will likely be educating children on insects, animals and the pest industry for a long time. Established in 1960, Suburban Exterminating is...

Winter Household Pest Prevention Tips

As the cold weather starts to get closer, household pests will begin the process of looking for warm places to wait out the winter. If your home offers a convenient place to spend the cold, dark days of winter, then those pests will move right on in. Every homeowner should have a checklist of things that can be done to help prevent pests from moving in and spending the winter. As pest control professionals, it is our job to educate our customers on best practices regarding prevention of household pests. Share these tips with your customers to help them keep their homes pest free this winter. Protect Your FoodHousehold pests are drawn to warmth and food. If you offer a ready source of either, then you can expect to hear scratching noises in the walls all winter long. To eliminate the lure of food, make sure that your garbage can lids are secure every day. Instead of over-stuffing a garbage can and setting the lid on top of the exposed garbage, go out and buy a new can. Inside the house, you need to try to eliminate the scent and availability of staple foods to prevent insects and larger pests from being attracted. Put all of your perishable food in plastic storage containers that can be sealed. The sealed containers will douse the scent and the plastic protection will prevent rodents and bugs from getting into your grains and baking supplies. Seal the HouseIt doesn’t take much space for a pest to find its way into your household. Rodents can get into your home through a hole the size...
Guest Post: Maximize earwig control with a granular insecticide.

Guest Post: Maximize earwig control with a granular insecticide.

Here in north Florida, earwig control really started getting heavy a few years ago. In the past, our customers used to see a few dead earwigs at their door step every now and then, but they started seeing them throughout the house – sometimes all the way into the second-floor bathrooms! I even started seeing them in my own home, too. Every morning, the parade of earwigs would begin in my kitchen. In general, this starts happening in late spring when it gets a little dry outside. They follow the pipes and electric lines inside the house looking for moisture. Earwigs are easily recognized by a pair of prominent appendages resembling forceps at the tail end of their bodies. They feed most actively at night and seek out dark, cool, moist places to hide during the day. Common hiding places are under loose clods of soil, in mulched garden areas, in dense growth of vines or weeds and under the loose bark on trees. While their name indicates they seek out human ears, there is little evidence to support these stories! However, they do prefer warm dark areas. Since the products we were using didn’t seem to be working on earwigs, we decided to try a new product, Talstar® XTRA featuring Verge™ granule technology. Our technicians began using it on call-backs for earwigs, applying it around pipes and the perimeters of houses. We discovered that it really rocks on earwigs! Our customers went from seeing numerous earwigs in the house everyday to seeing none – almost overnight. But what we didn’t expect were the super results we got on...
Measurement options for liquid insecticide formulations are all in the packaging.

Measurement options for liquid insecticide formulations are all in the packaging.

When you have the option of Product A vs. Product B and all other things being equal besides the packaging style, do you make your buying decision based on differences in the measurement options that either come with or are built into the product packaging? At FMC Professional Solutions, we have a dedicated packaging engineer that helps identify the best option for the targeted use. Measuring insecticide liquids accurately and easily is undoubtedly a very important part of daily pest control operations. As good product and environmental stewards, FMC has long since offered multi-dose containers to facilitate quick product measurement. For the technician, multi-dose containers reduce the potential for exposure and messy insecticide spills. For the branch or service manager, multi-dose containers provide reassurance that products will be measured accurately. Different insecticide formulations require different methods for using and maintaining the multi-dose container. Consider an emulsifiable concentrate (EC) versus a suspension concentrate (SC). SC formulations typically have a higher viscosity than EC formulations so the method to accurately measure differs as it requires more time to fill the multi-dose chamber. With a SC formulation, you will tip the bottle longer than you would an EC to fill to the same graduation line. Also, some formulations such as capsule suspensions (CS) can show phase separation after some time without use. According to Bob Albright, a senior global formulations chemist for the FMC Agricultural Products Group, “All SC and CS formulations settle or phase separate with time. We want to minimize the amount of settling that occurs. We modify the formula so that when settling occurs, mild shaking is all that...

Tame termites in the Wild West with a subterranean termite treatment.

When I bought my pest management business in 2005, the company had done mostly termite treatments up until then. My goal was to continue that work and branch into general pest control work, as well. Due to the decline in the housing market, termite treatments tapered off, but the general household pest market really picked up. The good news is: the housing market is improving and termite work is increasing along with it. Here in Arizona, we have a different species of termite – the Western subterranean termite. One of the most destructive pests in North America, the Western termite causes millions of dollars in damage throughout the Western states. Still, most people don’t purchase a preventive termite job in this area. They usually don’t call until they actually have termites. I’m a premium termiticide user – I don’t normally use generics, and I’ve always been a big fan of Talstar® Professional insecticide. So when FMC Professional Solutions introduced Transport® termiticide that incorporated acetameprid into the mixture with bifenthrin, I was intrigued.I did trials with the new product and found that it works really well. Transport termiticide is one of those products that surprised me. The two active ingredients provide two layers of treatment zones within the soil. The outer zone gives quick results against termites active inside and outside the structure, while the inner zone set us up a long-lasting barrier, preventing future invasions. Now, Transport termiticide is one of my mainstay products for termite work. At this point, termite treatments comprise about 20 percent of our business and we continue to get more calls than we did...
Transport® GHP Testimonial – Half the Volume Use and Lower Retreat Rates.

Transport® GHP Testimonial – Half the Volume Use and Lower Retreat Rates.

Chase Hazelwood is general manager of Go-Forth Pest & Lawn Service. An avid sports fan, he plays soccer all year long and closely follows the Charlotte Panthers. He and his wife, Leah, have two small children. Watch a video of Chase here In 1959, my grandfather, Frank Goforth, started a one-man pest management operation in High Point, N.C., now known as Go-Forth Pest & Lawn Service. My father, Chuck Hazelwood, took over in 1981, and I began running the business in 2008. For years, we handled strictly termite and pest management, but we established the lawn care division in 2011. Most of our business is residential customers within a 75-mile radius of High Point. Our 25 employees include two full-time lawn care specialists, four full-time termite technicians, 12 route technicians and a six-person office staff. We always set up ride-alongs to train our technicians. But it didn’t matter how many times we trained, there were always mistakes. We started using Transport® GHP insecticide in June 2011 as our primary insecticide. It provides excellent control and long residual. But the number one thing I like about it is that there is no measuring. The water-soluble packets make applications so much easier. Plus, it is a wettable powder formulation, which I really like. They seem to hold up better and have less environmental impact. Before Transport GHP, we weren’t happy with our retreat rates. We needed something with a longer residual. We found that Transport GHP stays on the surface longer. Now, we are not getting any spider retreats – and hardly any ant retreats. From 2011 to 2012, our retreat...