Top Tweets: Are These Pictures of Insects or Aliens?

Check out the most popular @FMCpest and @FMCbedbug tweets from the past two weeks, including a photography technique where pictures of insects look like pictures of aliens, why you should be blogging for your pest control business and an invasive pest that is decimating North Carolina forests. Be sure to follow us on Twitter for pest control industry news, expert advice and the very latest pest product updates from FMC Professional Solutions. Calling all pest photographers! @EntsocAmerica is looking for #insect photos for their 2015 calendar! http://t.co/J7cHVDjCXP — FMC Pest (@FMCpest) February 12, 2014 #Insects or aliens? With this new photography technique, it can be hard to tell! http://t.co/8Wdgz82mhl — FMC Pest (@FMCpest) February 17, 2014 Do you know what your state #insect is? Find out! http://t.co/aZumld2hZ9 — FMC Pest (@FMCpest) February 20, 2014 Looking for #pestcontrol industry links? We’ve got you covered! http://t.co/Q0E5SQzKvJ — FMC Bed Bugs (@FMCbedbug) February 20, 2014 If you’re not blogging for your #pestcontrol business, you should be. Here are some basic tips: http://t.co/GWi0GDVxHr — FMC Bed Bugs (@FMCbedbug) February 18, 2014 Western North Carolina is battling an invasive pest that is decimating forests. http://t.co/n7LnpcKT7p #pestcontrol — FMC Pest (@FMCpest) February 14, 2014 Looking for #pestcontrol industry links? We’ve got you covered! http://t.co/ZdEMCfj9Wl — FMC Pest (@FMCpest) February 19, 2014 According to an experiment, the polar vortex may have decimated stink bug populations. http://t.co/BQwspl1q23 #pestcontrol — FMC Pest (@FMCpest) February 21, 2014 How your customers can reduce spiders in their homes: http://t.co/VgJI3cNvgD Via @ThomasPestSvcs #pestcontrol — FMC Pest (@FMCpest) February 18, 2014 These five #insects have proven to be Olympians in their own ways....
Suburban Exterminating Makes the Pest Industry Fun for Kids

Suburban Exterminating Makes the Pest Industry Fun for Kids

Does a tarantula sting? What does a roach eat? These are only a few of the pest industry-related questions that the children in Suburban Exterminating’s summer library events ask. Looking to get more involved in the community, Suburban Exterminating found a way for their entomologists to give back: educating children on animals, insects and the pest industry. “Suburban Exterminating was looking to become more involved with the community,” Bill Somerville, entomologist and General Manager at Suburban Exterminating, said. “We decided to start a children’s library program since many Long Island libraries double as community centers.” Entering its fourth year, the library events aim to share the pest industry professionals’ love of insects while entertaining and educating the children. At each session, the children have the opportunity to get up close and personal with the insects, hamster and other animals that Suburban Exterminating brings along. Lynn Frank, entomologist and Technical Director, said, “The children learn about animal and insect characteristics. We talk about their basic survival skills and how they adapt.”Many children come to the program with knowledge about the pest industry. Jacob, age 10 from Southampton, told us that a carpenter ant’s scientific name was Camponotus pennsylvanicus. Arielle, age 9 from Huntington, knew that a hamster was nocturnal. Though the purpose of the shows is educational, they’re enjoyable for both the child and the pest industry professionals. “We seem to have as much fun as the children do,” Somerville said. Currently booking shows for 2014, Suburban Exterminating will likely be educating children on insects, animals and the pest industry for a long time. Established in 1960, Suburban Exterminating is...
EndZone™ Insecticide Sticker Voted “Best New Product” at 2014 Florida Pest & Lawn Care Expo

EndZone™ Insecticide Sticker Voted “Best New Product” at 2014 Florida Pest & Lawn Care Expo

FMC is proud to announce that its latest offering in fly control technology, the EndZone insecticide sticker, has been voted the best new product at the Florida Pest & Lawn Care Expo. A four-and-one-quarter inch square sticker coated with an acetamiprid bait matrix, EndZone is the latest in FMC pest control technologies. EndZone is proven to kill house flies in less than one minute and also aids in the control of phorid flies, fungus gnats, blow flies, bottle flies, flesh flies, little house flies and vinegar (fruit) flies. EndZone provides up to seven months of residual action indoors, and four months of residual outdoors (when not exposed to rain, excess moisture, dirt and dust). Insecticide product manager for FMC, Steve Mora shares his reaction to the honor. “We are very excited to learn that EndZone insecticide sticker won the ‘Best New Product’ award at the Florida show,” Mora said. “EndZone is an easy-to-use product which provides a solution to the fly problems PMPs in Florida – and throughout the country – are facing. “We are happy to know the industry is as excited about EndZone as we are” EndZone was chosen after a careful review of the exhibited products. On hand to accept the award was Florida Market Specialist and long-time FMC employee, Bruce Ryser. “What a nice surprise,” Ryser said. “On behalf of everyone at FMC who helped bring this product to the market, I want to say thank you to the Florida Pest Management Association.” EndZone insecticide stickers are available through pest management distribution channels. For more information check out a two-minute video of the pest control...

Pest In Focus: Termite Tubes Prior to Treatment

This month’s Pest In Focus was taken by Yates Pest Control of Dickson, Tennessee. The photo shows a termite tube in a garage, just prior to treatment. Termite tubes are built by termites to connect the nests with the food source and are one of the hallmark signs of an infestation. Stay tuned for more pest control industry snapshots—if you have a photo as cool as this termite tube photograph that you’d like to be featured on In Focus, please send it our way. On Twitter? Share your photo with @FMCpest or just add the #PestInFocus hash tag to your tweeted photo! What is In Focus? As a pest management professional, you often come across interesting situations. Infestations that have spread out of control. Pests living in peculiar places. Bugs of unbelievable sizes. Many of you even take pictures to document these encounters, and as pest management enthusiasts, we want to see them and share them with the...
Fly Control: The Service Cycle is Your Sales Cycle

Fly Control: The Service Cycle is Your Sales Cycle

Clients want magic results, and fly control is no exception. They want cars that go when they press the gas pedal, pills that make their pain go away, and pest management professionals that make the bugs go away, just by checking-in every 90 days. Magic takes audience participation, and nowhere is that more true than with pest management, but getting the client involved is more than a one-time trick. While every pest professional knows that commercial fly control comes down to an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) approach, knocking down flying pests is as much about the fly control products we apply, as it is about effectively and repeatedly training clients on their role. Taking the time during visits to cover the basics and educate your point-of-contact will be the difference between a less-than-successful fly control job, and a client who thinks you are a magician. To start, cover the basics every time. These are things your client should be communicating to their staff, involving everyone in fly control, so you should see evidence that everyone is aware. A starting point for effective fly control is to confirm that they are disposing of garbage at least two times per week. When it comes to covering food and garbage bins, you want to spot check that all lids fit tightly, and explain that this cuts off the adults who would lay eggs. Explain that water drains and grease pits should be deep cleaned of organic build-up, which they can do regularly by clearing the debris. Don’t forget to check that vents and fans are working, and explain that some flies do...