The Truth About Gallinippers and Other Mosquito Control Tips

The media has made much ado about “gallinipper” mosquitoes, but according to University of Florida’s Dr. Phil Kaufman, only a small percentage of Floridians will come in contact with them, and even then, the pests will not require any treatment. “The gallinipper is produced in low lying natural areas that flood intermittently, not containers, tires, garbage cans, gutters or even in ponds,” says Dr. Kaufman. “Only people in rural areas will encounter them, and usually just from June to October.” According to Kaufman, mosquito control should instead concentrate on species like Aedes albopictus and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus that have the potential to transmit disease-causing pathogens like the West Nile virus. As a refresher for mosquito season, Dr. Dina Richman of FMC Professional Solutions offers the following mosquito control tips:   Time it right. Repeat sprays are necessary because mosquitoes complete their life cycle—eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults—in 10-14 days. Most pest, as well as turf professionals, feel that spraying every three to four weeks will keep populations low, but always follow integrated pest management principles and product label requirements for your state.     Think management, not just control. Inspect for current or future breeding sites, including old tires, flower pots, garbage cans, poorly drained gutters, toys, poor grade slope or soil depressions, tree holes/cavities, bird baths, non-functioning fountains, watering cans, sump-pump discharge, and air conditioner and related discharge. Work with customers to drain or remove any breeding sites, fix windows or door screens, and, if necessary, contact a mosquito-abatement agency to address large breeding sites such as ponds.     Treat. Create a barrier with adulticide treatments of...

FMC Pest Wire Top Tweets

Check out the most popular @FMCpest and @FMCbedbug tweets from the past two weeks, including a versatile granular insecticide and introducing the Verifi four-pack. Be sure to follow us on Twitter for pest control industry news, expert advice and the very latest on general pest control and bed bug management solutions from FMC Professional Solutions. #Pest pros: Do you have a great photo you captured on the job? Tweet it to us!ow.ly/l4xZt #PestInFocus — FMC Bed Bugs (@FMCbedbug) May 15, 2013 This alarming photo shows why #pest pros should protect their skin from #UVrays, even when behind the wheel. ow.ly/kNLjQ — FMC Pest (@FMCpest) May 13, 2013 .@bedbugcentral is holding a one-day on-the-job #bedbug observation in New Jersey this June. Learn more: ow.ly/li4cV — FMC Bed Bugs (@FMCbedbug) May 22, 2013 Check out this interactive map that’s tracking the 17- year #cicada swarmageddon: ow.ly/l1bu7 #BroddII via @griffinpest — FMC Pest (@FMCpest) May 14, 2013 A successful #bedbug management approach in four steps: ow.ly/lfS5a — FMC Bed Bugs (@FMCbedbug) May 22, 2013 If you’re experiencing increased call-backs, consider switching to this insecticide with residual. ow.ly/l4tu6 #pestcontrol — FMC Pest (@FMCpest) May 15, 2013 Introducing the Verifi 4-pack, a whole new way to purchase Verifi! ow.ly/lfR1l #bedbugs — FMC Bed Bugs (@FMCbedbug) May 21, 2013 Your outdoor #pestcontrol can now be more versatile than you ever thought possible. Learn more: ow.ly/l4wYf — FMC Pest (@FMCpest) May 16, 2013 The @ncpestmgmt has released a new booklet to educate people on preventing the spread of #bedbugs: ow.ly/l68IU via @pctmagazine — FMC Bed Bugs (@FMCbedbug) May 16, 2013 Thanks to @ortexjake of @ortexpest for...
Guest Post: Maximize earwig control with a granular insecticide.

Guest Post: Maximize earwig control with a granular insecticide.

Here in north Florida, earwig control really started getting heavy a few years ago. In the past, our customers used to see a few dead earwigs at their door step every now and then, but they started seeing them throughout the house – sometimes all the way into the second-floor bathrooms! I even started seeing them in my own home, too. Every morning, the parade of earwigs would begin in my kitchen. In general, this starts happening in late spring when it gets a little dry outside. They follow the pipes and electric lines inside the house looking for moisture. Earwigs are easily recognized by a pair of prominent appendages resembling forceps at the tail end of their bodies. They feed most actively at night and seek out dark, cool, moist places to hide during the day. Common hiding places are under loose clods of soil, in mulched garden areas, in dense growth of vines or weeds and under the loose bark on trees. While their name indicates they seek out human ears, there is little evidence to support these stories! However, they do prefer warm dark areas. Since the products we were using didn’t seem to be working on earwigs, we decided to try a new product, Talstar® XTRA featuring Verge™ granule technology. Our technicians began using it on call-backs for earwigs, applying it around pipes and the perimeters of houses. We discovered that it really rocks on earwigs! Our customers went from seeing numerous earwigs in the house everyday to seeing none – almost overnight. But what we didn’t expect were the super results we got on...

Pest In Focus: A Ninja Termite Tube Found During a Termite Treatment

This month’s Pest In Focus was taken by Jake of Ortex Pest Control during a recent termite treatment. This strategically built termite tube shows just how creative worker termites can be when searching for food sources above ground. @ortexpest termites are ninjas twitter.com/OrtexJake/stat… — Jake(@OrtexJake) May 8, 2013 Although we’re in the industry to control these pests, sometimes it’s worth it to take a step back and admire the versatile work termites can do. Termite tubes come in all shapes and sizes, just like this giant termite tube captured by pest management professional Bob Howard of Insect City located in central Texas. Stay tuned for more great snapshots—and if you have a photo you’d like to be featured on In Focus, please send it our way. On Twitter? Share your photo with @FMCpest or just add the #PestInFocus hash tag to your tweeted photo! What is In Focus? As a pest management professional, you often come across interesting situations. Infestations that have spread out of control. Pests living in peculiar places. Bugs of unbelievable sizes. Many of you even take pictures to document these encounters, and as pest management enthusiasts, we want to see them and share them with the...
Electrical Safety Tips for Kids During National Electrical Safety Month

Electrical Safety Tips for Kids During National Electrical Safety Month

Curiosity is a natural part of childhood learning, but it can be extremely dangerous when it comes to electricity. FMC, along with the Electrical Safety Foundation International, is dedicated to reducing the number of childhood injuries and deaths from electrically-related accidents through education and awareness. From game consoles to computers to cell phones, electricity is an increasing presence in our lives, and more electricity usage means more potential hazards. To effectively teach children about safe practices with electricity, it is imperative to teach them not only about electrical safety, but about electricity itself. The best way to keep children and older adults safe is to ensure we are taking steps to prevent electrical injury while at the same time making preparations to safely escape if there is an emergency. Please share the below electrical safety tips with your children: Plan a fire escape route and practice it with your children. Don’t allow children to play with electrical toys near water and make sure they know water and electricity DO NOT MIX! Never allow children to play with electrical cords, light switches or outlets. Never leave a child unsupervised while cooking or when a stove is within reach. Keep liquids and drinks away from electronics such as computers, video games and TVs as liquids could spill and cause shock or fire. Do not use space heaters in rooms where children are unsupervised and make sure the heater is at least three feet from any combustible. Never rest anything, like clothing or toys, on top of a lamp. Placing flammables near light bulbs is a fire hazard. For more information, visit...